Duke Majors Fair

Please join us at the Duke Majors Fair where The Center for Child and Family Policy will provide information on the Child Policy Research Certificate. This informative event is for undeclared students to meet representatives from all majors, minors and certificate programs to learn more about their programs.

Dr. Jelani Cobb, Dean of Columbia University and a staff writer at The New Yorker, writing on race, history, justice, politics, and democracy will kick off the October 22, 2022 Color of Education Summit. The summit will be delivered in an hybrid format to bring together people from all over North Carolina to exchange ideas and strategies that address systemic racial inequities in our education system.

Color of Education is a partnership between the Dudley Flood Center for Educational Equity & Opportunity, the Public School Forum of North Carolina, the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University, and the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. The partnership seeks to build bridges across the fields of research, policy, and practice and bring together the knowledge and perspectives of communities, educators, policymakers, experts and other key stakeholders focused on achieving racial equity and dismantling systemic racism in education across the state of North Carolina.

The 2022 summit, “A Walk Through History: How the Past Informs the Present,” will allow participants to see the connection between the past and the present to develop a deeper understanding on current educational policies which ultimately impact outcomes.

A quarterly meeting for all CCFP employees and affiliates.

The Sanford School of Public Policy and the Center for Child and Family Policy invite you to attend a reception celebrating the launch of Family Connects International. This event will celebrate the individuals who have been instrumental in the research, implementation, and management of this successful nurse home visiting program.

The Family Connects model was established in Durham in 2008 through a partnership with the Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, the Center for Child & Family Health, and the Durham County Health Department. It was designed to support whole-person, integrated health for all families of newborns. FCI nurses visit families at their home to assess newborns, mothers, and other household family members to discuss concrete next steps to address opportunities and concerns, including seeking immediate medical care when necessary. The model is in various stages of exploring, planning, implementation, and certification in communities across 18 states, where it aims to connect with at least 80 percent of the newborn families.

According to Executive Director Sherika Hill, “FCI is unique from other nurse-home visiting programs for newborns, including those that are universal, because we are willing to tailor our evidence-based program, implementation guidance, and policy support to the different contexts of our community partners. In doing so, we hope to have a bigger impact for families of newborns as we scale with quality assurance and community accountability.”

An opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

An opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.