Child Policy Research Certificate Graduation Ceremony

Celebrating the students who are graduating with a certificate in Child Policy Research.

Since February 24, 2022, Ukrainians have endured a multitude of horrors, including war crimes, violence, and mental trauma, with civilians facing constant shelling and displacement as refugees. Psychologists treating the complex post-traumatic effects face a unique challenge due to the unprecedented nature of the war trauma. However, despite the significant symptoms of acute stress, Ukrainians exhibit remarkable resilience in coping with the trauma. Dr. Prokhovnik-Raphique will explore these coping mechanisms and discuss ways in which volunteers and supporters can aid in the recovery process.

Dr. Alla Prokhovnik-Raphique is a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of trauma and addictive disorders in her private practice, Nurturing Roots Psychology. She holds a voluntary faculty appointment at Icahn Medical School at Mount Sinai where she supervises psychology interns on their rotations at the Addiction Institute, as well as conducts forensic evaluations for individuals seeking asylum through the Mount Sinai Human Rights Clinic. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Prokhovnik-Raphique serves as the COO for Ukraine NGO Coordination Network (UNCN), a network of non-profit organizations providing all forms of humanitarian aid to Ukraine.

Registration: https://duke.is/Ukraine-learn

A quarterly meeting for all employees of the Center for Child and Family Policy.

In recent years, several states have expanded a new publicly-funded learning option: transitional kindergarten (TK).TK programs bridge prekindergarten and kindergarten in their eligibility requirements and design. In this talk, Dr. Christina Weiland will share findings from the first systematic research on Michigan’s TK program, which is open to all age-eligible children in districts that offer it and compensates teachers with parity with their K-12 colleagues.

Findings show that districts that elect to offer TK programs tend to serve proportionally more advantaged children. Within offering districts, demographically diverse families take up the program and districts also tend to locate the program in schools with higher proportions of children from economically disadvantaged families. Using an augmented regression discontinuity design, the research team found that TK improves third-grade test scores by 0.29 (math) and 0.19 (English Language Arts) standard deviations relative to a counterfactual that includes other formal and informal early learning options. These impacts are notably large relative to prior pre-K literature. Weiland will discuss the implications of her team’s findings for early childhood investments and models in Michigan and nationally.

Christina Weiland is an associate professor at the Marsal Family School of Education at the University of Michigan and (by courtesy) the Ford School of Public Policy, where she is affiliated with the Educational Studies Department and the Combined Program in Psychology and Education program. She serves as co-director of the Education Policy Initiative at the Ford School of Public Policy and as director of the University of Michigan’s Predoctoral Training Program in Causal Inference in Education Policy Research. She is also a senior research fellow at the Learning Policy Institute and a non-resident fellow at the Urban Institute.

Weiland’s research focuses on the effects of early childhood interventions and public policies on children’s development, especially on children from families with low incomes. She is particularly interested in the active ingredients that drive children’s gains in successful, at-scale public preschool programs. She holds an Ed.D. (quantitative policy analysis in education), an MA from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA from Dartmouth College.

The Early Childhood Initiative seeks to bring together scholars to address early childhood challenges and produce world-class scholarship that will help maximize the potential of all children during their early years.

Please join us for a reception immediately following the talk.

Ever wondered what a think tanks is, what they do, and if they might be a good fit for your career interests? Join us to learn more about what it is like to work at a think tank from Libby Doyle, current Duke MPP student and former research analyst with the Urban Institute, and Emilia Sotolongo, Senior Technical Assistance Analyst at Child Trends.

May 13-17. This is a time for concentrated writing and other “deep thinking” activities that can be hard to accomplish when days are dominated by meetings. We encourage employees not to schedule meetings so they can focus their efforts on writing or other work that benefits from long stretches of concentrated effort.

The Triangle Economics of Education Workshop (TEEW) will bring together scholars to present and discuss empirical research on the economics of education.

This year’s keynote speaker is Randall Reback, professor in the Barnard Economics Department and a faculty affiliate at Columbia University’s Population Research Center. His talk is entitled Beyond Labels:  Helping Educators Address Each Child’s Unique Needs.

Reback’s research focuses on the economics of education, especially as it relates to elementary and secondary school policies. He has published research articles concerning school accountability programs, school choice, college guidebook ratings, teacher labor markets, school finance, and schools’ mental health services.

Before arriving at Barnard, Reback was a fifth-grade public school teacher in California and a predoctoral scholar at the University of Michigan’s Population Studies Center. He served as editor of  the highly-ranked journal, Education Finance & Policy, from 2019 to 2023. His research has been recognized by grants and awards from the Spencer Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Institute for Education Sciences, the American Education Finance Association, and the National Institute of Mental Health.

This event, which is co-sponsored by the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy and the Department of Public Policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will be held in person only. Please view the conference abstracts for more information.

Significant advances in psychological science have shed insight on how to best support the achievement and well-being of students from a diverse range of backgrounds. This talk covers research on specific factors shaping the experiences and outcomes of students from marginalized communities. Recent studies provide evidence regarding the effects of strengths-based messages about students’ marginalized identities. A series of experiments demonstrate the importance of strengths-based messages from various levels of social and contextual forces surrounding students.

Mesmin Destin is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology and School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. He is also a fellow of Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research and the inaugural faculty director of Student Access & Enrichment. He completed his Ph.D. in social psychology at the University of Michigan in 2010. Destin uses experiments and other methods to investigate factors shaping the experiences and outcomes of students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. He received the American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution in 2019 and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 2021.

The Early Childhood Initiative seeks to bring together scholars to address early childhood challenges and produce world-class scholarship that will help maximize the potential of all children during their early years.

Please join us for a reception immediately following the talk.

A Zoom option is available.

Featuring Ann Skinner and Jennifer Godwin, research scientists at the Center for Child and Family Policy.

Abstract: Using eight waves of longitudinal data from young adults (n=936) during the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020-December 2022) from eight countries in the Parenting Across Cultures study, we have run initial LGCA models across all countries.  Initial results point to a three-class model of patterns of internalizing symptoms, externalizing symptoms, and substance use. We would like to present our initial results and discuss ideas for documenting these patterns across time, especially after we separate them out by country. We plan to model these results to see if the class membership varies by country, by the extent of COVID restrictions in place at that country at the time, and/or by pre-pandemic levels of adjustment and substance use.

 

Join us to learn about working at policy and advocacy nonprofit organizations. We will be joined by Neil Harrington from NC Child, Brennan Lewis from Equality NC, and Elizabeth Paul from the Public School Forum of North Carolina. Our panelists are working to improve the lives of North Carolinians through their work at nonprofits focused on children and families, education, and the LGBTQ+ community. Panelists will talk about what they do, why they enjoy the work they do, what led them to their current positions and how to pursue non-profit policy jobs.

Neil Harrington is the research director for NC Child where he is passionate about using data and research to illustrate the experiences of North Carolina children and families and identify areas in which state policy can improve opportunities for all children to succeed. Prior to NC Child, Harrington worked for the Labor & Economic Analysis Division at the NC Department of Commerce and a research and public relations consulting firm in Jackson, Mississippi. He holds a BA in political science from the University of Mississippi and a master of public policy degree from Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy.

As the policy and research manager at the Public School Forum of North Carolina, Elizabeth Paul leads the Forum’s research, advocacy, and publication work, with a primary focus on policy and data analysis, especially as it relates to school finance and student outcomes. Paul is a first-generation college student and holds a B.S. in human and organizational development and a B.A in English from Vanderbilt University, along with a master of public policy degree from Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy.

Brennan Lewis’ career has focused on helping to elevates the voices, work, and lives of LGBTQ youth. Currently, Lewis works as an education policy associate at Equality NC. Previously, they served as the regional manager for the U.S. and Canada at Peace First. Additionally, Brennan is the founder of the Raleigh-based LGBTQ youth group QueerNC. Brennan is dedicated to mobilizing young people to lead change both in North Carolina and globally. They obtained a BA in public policy and women’s and gender studies from UNC Chapel Hill and spent time as a Duke student while an undergrad Robertson Scholar.

Zoom option available.

Sesame Street’s representation of minority characters, egalitarian minority-White interactions and portrayal of working women was distinctive in the mass media landscape of 1969, when it started airing. By exploiting both age variation and technological variation in broadcast reception, this paper contributes to the media and contact theory literatures by showing that positive representations of minorities via mass media can reduce long-run prejudice and impact voting, an important societal outcome. We find that for preschool-age children, a 20 percentage point (1 standard deviation) increase in Sesame Street coverage reduced adult measures of implicit racial biases for White respondents and increased reported voting for minority and women candidates by 14 percent and 9.5  percent respectively. Voter turnout also increased by 4.8 percent. Voting for democratic candidates increased because of the increase in voting for diverse candidates. When the sample is restricted to ballots featuring White men, turnout gains are split between parties.

Claire Duquennois is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh. She is an applied microeconomist working at the intersection between labor, development, and behavioral economics. Recent work explores the cognitive impacts of poverty on kids and sleep, seasonality in rural labor markets and the impacts of child media. Her research has appeared in academic journals including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Food Policy.

The Early Childhood Initiative seeks to bring together scholars to address early childhood challenges and produce world-class scholarship that will help maximize the potential of all children during their early years.

Please join us for a reception immediately following the talk.

Click here for directions to the Sanford Building. Visitor parking is available at the Science Drive visitor’s lot, a short walk from Rubenstein Hall. The rate is $2 per hour.

Join us to hear from New York Times bestselling author, and Professor of Law, Adam Benforado, as he offers a sharp indictment of America’s mistreatment of children and a bold agenda for placing youth rights at the center of policymaking.

We have an ability unparalleled in human history to ensure the well-being of kids, but we have not seized the moment. This is a moral problem, but it’s also an economic and social one: by failing our children today, we doom ourselves in the years ahead. The root cause of nearly every major challenge we face—from crime to poor health to poverty—can be found in our neglect. But in that sobering truth is also the key to changing our fate as a nation. We must reform our world—our institutions, our laws, our business practices, our parenting—to put children first.

Benforado is a professor of law at the Drexel University Kline School of Law and the New York Times best-selling author of A Minor Revolution: How Prioritizing Kids Benefits Us All and Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice. His research, teaching, and advocacy are focused on children’s rights and criminal justice. A graduate of Yale College and Harvard Law School, he served as a clerk on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and as an attorney at Jenner & Block in Washington, D.C. He has published numerous scholarly articles and his popular writing has appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Scientific American, Time, Rolling Stone, and The Atlantic.

Benforado will speak at Duke as part of the Wilson Lecture. Endowed by Robert R. Wilson, this prestigious lecture is open to the public and the entire Duke University campus. This lecture series brings speakers to campus to highlight important conversations in public law. Event partners for this lecture include the Sanford School of Public Policy, the Center for Child and Family Policy, and Duke Centennial. For questions about this event, please feel free to email sanfordevents@duke.edu.

The livestream will be viewable via the Sanford YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/user/DukeSanfordSchool. The event will be recorded, and the recording will be available at the link after the event.

Featuring Jennifer Mann, research scientist for the Bridging English Language Learning and Academics (BELLA) project.

Abstract: This research talk is a collaborative discussion regarding the possible extension of Jennifer Mann’s dissertation research, which focuses on fostering social change through critical literacy with refugee-background students in community spaces. Through a social-design-based research approach, which centers equity, Mann provided opportunities for student learning, collaboration, and action. She is interested in exploring ways to continue and expand this research into schools.

Prior to working at CCFP, Mann spent sixteen years as an educator, teaching high school English, elementary and adult English as a Second Language (ESL), and undergraduate pre-service English and ESL education. In 2023, she received her Ph.D. in Teacher Education and Learning Sciences from North Carolina State University, where she specialized in Literacy and English Language Arts.

Her research interests include refugee and immigrant education, culturally sustaining critical pedagogies, and equity centered, participatory qualitative methodologies.

Lunch will be provided for those who register in advance.

 

Featuring Whitney McCoy, research scientist at the Center for Child and Family Policy.

Abstract: This research talk will discuss building a network of diverse higher education scholars, STEM career professionals, students, teachers, and advocates in the Black community focused on addressing the challenge of access and opportunity to informal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. More specifically the Dreams of Boosting Innovation for Girls Network (Dream B.I.G. Network) will focus on identifying a praxis-oriented framework of race, gender, and place intersecting for Black girls, examine the landscape of informal STEM education, and pinpoint the components needed to enhance and challenge the norms and beliefs that contribute to inequity in Black girl identity development, engagement, and persistence in informal K-12 STEM education.

Featuring Shannon Egan-Dailey, postdoctoral associate in the Sanford School of Public Policy.

Abstract: Children from low socioeconomic-status homes hear less child-directed speech than their more advantaged peers. However, no study has investigated the causal impact of family income or poverty reduction on children’s language input. Using data from Baby’s First Years, this project assesses the causal impact of monthly, unconditional cash transfers on child-directed speech and child vocalizations among a large, racially diverse sample of low-income U.S. mothers and their one-year-olds. We find no significant impacts of the cash gifts on maternal child-directed speech during a 10-minute play session, but we highlight wide variability within our low-income sample.

A fundamental motivation in human development is wanting to feel recognized, appreciated, and capable of actions that benefit others. These motivations begin in childhood but are amplified in adolescence. This motivation (to ‘matter’ and to feel that one’s actions matter to others) can exert a strong influence on behavior as young adolescents explore and learn how to navigate increasingly complex and uncertain social environments. This creates a formative period of social learning that can shape identity development. Understanding this sensitive period of learning has implications for early intervention strategies to impact trajectories of behavioral and emotional health and social development.

Ronald E. Dahl is the director of the Institute of Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley, where he also serves as a professor in the School of Public Health and the Joint Medical Program and runs the Adolescent Research Collaborative. He is the founding director of the Center for the Developing Adolescent, where he provides the strategic vision for the Center’s research agenda. He is a pediatrician and developmental scientist with long-standing research interests in the development of sleep/arousal regulation, affect regulation, and the development of behavioral and emotional disorders in children and adolescents.

His current work focuses on adolescence as a developmental period with unique opportunities for early intervention in relation to a wide range of behavioral and emotional health problems. His research is interdisciplinary and bridges basic developmental research (emphasizing social and affective neuroscience) and the translation of this work into clinical and social policy relevance. He has published extensively on child and adolescent development, sleep disorders, behavioral/emotional health in children, adolescent brain development and the policy implications of this work. He has been elected as a fellow of several organizations, including the Association for Psychological Science, American Academy of Pediatrics, New York Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He is also a founding editor of the journal Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience and is past president of the Society for Research in Child Development.

This lecture is made possible through an endowment from the Arthur Sulzberger Family. Please join us for a reception  following the talk.

Click here for directions to the Sanford School. Visitor parking is available at the Science Drive visitor’s lot, a short walk from the Sanford School. The rate is $2 per hour.

A quarterly meeting for all employees of the Center for Child and Family Policy.

An opportunity for all Center employees to celebrate the holiday season together.

December 11-15. This is a time for concentrated writing and other “deep thinking” activities that can be hard to accomplish when days are dominated by meetings. For our inaugural Deep Work Week, we encourage employees not to schedule meetings so they can focus their efforts on writing or other work that benefits from long stretches of concentrated effort. This idea was suggested during the Center’s Research Retreat in August.

Community-based Interventions and Engagement with LGBTQ Communities, featuring Dirk Davis.

Join Dirk A. Davis, PhD, MPH, a Global Health Instructor and faculty member in the Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, the Duke Global Health Institute, and the Duke Sexual and Gender Minority Wellness Program as he shares a few of the community-based interventions with LGBTQ communities his team is working on. He will also provide recommendations for how best to engage with LGBTQ communities when doing research.

The Equity in Research Learning Collaborative series serves as an opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

An opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

Featuring Dr. Keisha Bentley-Edwards.

This workshop is an opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

The School Research Partnership in the Center for Child and Family Policy invites you to hear from school district leaders to to learn more about conducting research in local school settings on Thursday, November 2 at 11:00 a.m. in Rhodes Conference Room, Sanford 223.

During this panel discussion, research administrators from local school districts will describe their districts' research priorities as well as the process for applying for approval to conduct research in school settings. The director of Duke University's Institutional Review Board will also provide perspective on the process of submitting protocols for research in school settings to Campus IRB.

Participants include Amanda Moran of Chatham County Schools, Colleen Paeplow of Wake County Public Schools, Albert Royster of Durham Public Schools, and Holly Williams of Duke University's Institutional Review Board.

Leslie Babinski, director of the School Research Partnership at Duke, will moderate the discussion.

Faculty and researchers associated with the Center for Child and Family Policy are invited to network at a happy hour sponsored by CCFP. This event is being held as part of a larger effort to encourage collaboration on future grant funding.

Featuring Dr. Sarah Gaither.

An opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

In this session, we will learn about opportunities to work with children and families in other countries, what it’s like to live and work abroad, and how their experiences have influenced their career paths.

Featuring Thomas Cheng, Duke MPP and MBA student with global experience in schools, nonprofits, large companies, and emerging startups; Maria Goodfellow, Duke MPP student, former Peace Corp volunteer in Paraguay and Peace Corp recruiter; and Ruth Lee, currently with The Hunt Institute, formerly a teacher in Israel, Korea and Baltimore.

Thomas Cheng is passionate about educating, connecting, and motivating people to achieve great things. His background is in the education sector, with global experience in schools, nonprofits, large companies, and emerging startups. He worked in partnerships and growth at TAL Education Group (one of China's largest education companies) and VIPKid (edtech unicorn), as well as teaching, training, and fundraising at Teach For China (rural education nonprofit). He is currently pursuing a Master of Business Administration and Master of Public Policy at Duke University.

Maria Goodfellow is part of the MPP class of 2024. Originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico, she attended Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa, where she studied biology and anthropology while also competing on the school's nationally-ranked Mock Trial team. After graduating, she served in the Peace Corps from 2016-2018 as an agricultural extensionist in Paraguay. Upon her return to the U.S., Goodfellow continued to work for Peace Corps, first as a diversity recruiter in New Mexico and Texas, and then as special assistant to the presidentially appointed associate director leading Volunteer Recruitment and Selection. Goodfellow is particularly passionate about DEI, financial literacy, and food security.

Ruth Lee joined The Hunt Institute as a senior policy analyst in January 2023. Prior to joining the Institute, she served in the Maryland Senate President's Office, working closely with the deputy chief of staff and communications director to develop equitable legislation regarding economics, education, childcare, and public health for the people of Maryland. Previously, Lee worked in higher education at Johns Hopkins University and was a teacher in Baltimore, Israel, and Korea. She holds a master's degree in education from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in human development and psychology from the University of California Davis.

This speaker series is for Duke students who want to learn more about careers in child and family policy. Meetings are designed to help students explore the wide range of job opportunities and careers available in the field of child and family policy while creating a network of students who share their professional interests.

Stephen Ezekoye, Zack Kaplan and Dylan Moore will join us to talk about their experiences in Teach For America and how TFA launched their future studies and careers. Ezekoye (TFA 2018, Eastern N.C.) is currently pursuing an MBA, Moore (TFA 2017, Memphis) is part of the MPP program at Duke, and Kaplan (TFA 2015, Durham) earned a JD.

Join us to learn more about Teach For America as a launching pad for working in child and family policy.

Stephen Ezekoye is a current second-year MBA candidate at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. He is currently the MBA Association student body co-president and a 2023-2024 Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship Social Impact Fellow. Ezekoye graduated with a B.A, in political science/government from the University of Pittsburgh then moved to Battleboro, North Carolina, as a member of the Teach For America Corps to serve as a 6th and 7th grade math instructor. After he concluded his term as a teacher, he took on a role as a recruitment manager for TFA in New York City, and was subsequently promoted to the role of director of early engagement, where he worked on scaling and advancing TFA's high-impact tutoring program 'IGNITE' and also worked on the Family Focused Education Policy Agenda as a policy and government extern. He also engaged in a six-month Policy Advocacy Fellowship with State House Representative Josie Raymond of Kentucky's 31st District, conducting policy and legislative research in early childhood education to support efforts for the "Pre-K for All (KY)" initiative.  Ezekoye recently concluded his summer associateship within the financial sector at Citigroup in New York City and has a deep desire to pursue careers within impact investing, social innovation/entrepreneurship, and economic development.

Zack Kaplan currently serves as a law clerk to Judge James Wynn on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Previously, he served as a Dellinger Fellow at the North Carolina Department of Justice, a law clerk to Justice Robin Hudson on the North Carolina Supreme Court, and a fifth grade teacher in Durham. Kaplan attended UNC Chapel Hill and Duke Law School, where he focused on the intersection of education law and racial justice. After his clerkship, he will begin work at a civil rights law firm in Raleigh. 

Born and raised in Pullman, Washington, Dylan Moore earned his B.S. in biochemistry from the University of Washington in Seattle. After graduating, he traveled as a Bonderman Fellow across the Caribbean, South America, and North Africa. Moore later joined Teach For America Memphis, where he taught biology and environmental science to the brilliant youth of the Westwood and Whitehaven communities. While in Memphis, he engaged in community organizing, served as a Leadership for Educational Equity Fellow with Stand for Children, and worked as a policy fellow on the mayoral campaign of County Commissioner Tami Sawyer. Moore then transitioned fully into policy work, working as a Teach For America Capitol Hill Fellow. He then served as a legislative assistant in the U.S House of Representatives for then-Majority Whip James Clyburn, where he covered a variety of policy issues, including climate and the environment, manufacturing, financial services, and higher education. As part of the MPP program at Duke, he is focused on understanding how policy can create systemic solutions that promote economic justice and facilitate human flourishing. During the summer of 2023, he participated in the Duke Global Policy Program in Geneva, supporting the capacity-building work within the Division for Multilateral Diplomacy at the United Nations Institute for Training and Research.

This speaker series is for Duke students who want to learn more about careers in child and family policy. Meetings are designed to help students explore the wide range of job opportunities and careers available in the field of child and family policy while creating a network of students who share their professional interests.

A quarterly meeting for all employees of the Center for Child and Family Policy.

This event will celebrate the achievements of two distinguished scholars, Dr. Anna Gassman-Pines and Dr. Jennifer Lansford, who have been recognized with prestigious awards from the American Psychological Association’s Division 7 for their outstanding contributions to the field of developmental science. Both Gassman-Pines and Lansford have demonstrated an unwavering dedication to the field of developmental psychology, leveraging their research to drive positive change in society, particularly for the well-being of children and families.

Gassman-Pines received the highly acclaimed 2024 Mavis Hetherington Award for Excellence in Applied Developmental Science. This recognition honors her exceptional commitment to advancing the well-being of children, families, and organizations through her scholarly contributions and applied developmental science. She is a professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy and the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience and is a faculty affiliate at the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy.

Lansford was awarded the esteemed 2024 Mary Ainsworth Award for Excellence in Developmental Science. This honor acknowledges her exceptional scientific merit and groundbreaking work, which has opened new empirical and theoretical areas within developmental psychology and fostered interdisciplinary connections. Lansford is the director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy and a research professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy.

During this event, Gassman-Pines will share her research on how work hours and income instability shaped families’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Her talk will include some of the unconventional policy approaches that were tried during the pandemic which provide insight about ways to help stabilize families going forward.

Lansford will discuss child protection in the U.S. and internationally, showcasing data from the Parenting Across Cultures Project, a longitudinal study of families in nine countries which began in 2008. She will describe aspects of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals that are focused on child protection, how countries are trying to achieve child protection goals (e.g., legal bans of corporal punishment), No Hit Zones in the U.S., and parenting programs that have been implemented to improve children’s well-being by reducing violence against them.

Please join us for a reception after the talk.

Drawing from experiences of dozens of cash transfer programs in low- and middle-income countries, Dr. Paul Niehaus will summarize key findings and share his internationally informed perspective, covering challenges to designing and launching randomized controlled studies, interpreting evidence from diverse contexts, and highlighting features that translate across contexts, including the U.S.

Niehaus is an economist and entrepreneur working to accelerate the end of extreme poverty. He is Chancellor’s Associates Endowed Chair in Economics at UC San Diego and an affiliate of BREAD, the Center for Effective Global Action, the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), and the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research examines the design, implementation, and impact of anti-poverty programs at large scales.

Niehaus is co-founder of a series of companies working to amplify capital flows to emerging markets. He is also co-founder, former president, and current director at GiveDirectly, the leading international NGO specialized in digital cash transfers and consistently rated one of the most impactful ways to give. Niehaus is a recipient of a Sloan Fellowship and has been named a “Top 100 Global Thinker” by Foreign Policy magazine. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Lisa Gennetian, Pritzker Professor of Early Learning Policy Studies at the Sanford School of Public Policy, will moderate the event.

This lecture, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Duke University Population Research Institute. Please join us for a reception after the talk, sponsored by the Duke Center for International Development.

New employees will learn about the Center’s work and culture and meet other new and current employees. Contact Berkeley Yorkery with any questions.

The Color of Education Summit brings together North Carolina educators, policymakers, researchers, students, parents, community members, and other key stakeholders focused on achieving racial equity and eliminating racial disparities in education. This year’s theme will focus on The Path Forward: Co-Creating Equitable Spaces.

Dr. Lisa Delpit, author and principal of the consulting firm, Delpit Learning, will deliver the keynote address. Previously, she was the executive director/eminent scholar for the Center for Urban Education & Innovation at Florida International University and the Benjamin E. Mays Chair of Urban Educational Excellence at Georgia State University.

Delpit is an internationally-known speaker and writer whose work has focused on the education of children of color and the perspectives, aspirations, and pedagogy of teachers of color. Her work on school-community relations and cross-cultural communication was cited as a contributor to her receiving a MacArthur “Genius” Award in 1990. Her books include Teaching When the World Is On Fire, “Multiplication is For White People”: Raising Standards for Other People’s Children, and Other People’s Children, which received the American Educational Studies Association’s Book Critic Award.

This year’s summit will also include an address from Jerry Craft. He is the New York Times bestselling author and illustrator of the graphic novels New Kid and Class ActNew Kid is the only book in history to win the John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature (2020), the Kirkus Prize for Young Readers’ Literature (2019), and the Coretta Scott King Author Award for the most outstanding work by an African American writer (2020).

Sponsored by the The Dudley Flood Center for Educational Equity and Opportunity at the Public School Forum of North Carolina, along with partners the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity and the Center for Child and Family Policy, both part of Duke University.

The cost to attend in person is $85; virtual attendance is $60. A limited number of free tickets are available.

The Equity in Research Learning Collaborative will discuss the Duke’s Native American Studies Initiative and conducting research with this population. This is an opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

Youth Participatory Action Research featuring Dr. Carmen Kealy.

An opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

An opportunity for our staff to learn how to make CCFP research more equitable with respect to race, ethnicity, and other forms of diversity at all stages from conceptualization to recruitment to data collection to analysis and reporting of findings.

CCFP faculty affiliates, research scientists, and research staff are invited to participate in the CCFP retreat to create an environment where research and funding collaborations may be developed, tended and, ultimately, grown to success. We hope faculty and researchers will find common ground among research projects with the intention of increasing grant submissions and funding.  

The meeting will be a fast paced, half-day retreat that will coalesce around the many research projects housed at CCFP.

In 2019, researchers began conducting immersive interviews in Appalachia, Texas, and seven southern states in an attempt to determine the causes of “place-based disadvantage.” Immersing themselves in these communities, pouring over centuries of local history, they traced the legacies of the deepest poverty in America—including inequalities shaping people’s health, livelihoods, and upward social mobility for families.

“In place after place,” they write, “we discovered astonishing stories about the industries that fueled the rise of our nation, the workers who sustained them, and the histories of human suffering they wrought.”

Kathryn Edin, William Church Osborn Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University, and Timothy Nelson, lecturer in the Department of Sociology at Princeton, will present findings featured in their new book, The Injustice of Place: Uncovering the Legacy of Poverty in America.

Edin, one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers, has authored eight books and some 60 journal articles. Her book, $2 a Day: The Art of Living on Virtually Nothing in America, was met with wide critical acclaim and was included in The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2015, cited as “essential reporting about the rise in destitute families.”

She is PI of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation, was a founding member of the MacArthur Foundation-funded Network on Housing and Families with Young Children, and was a past member of the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy. In 2014, she was elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2019.

Nelson is the author of numerous articles on low-income fathers and is the co-author, with Edin, of the book, Doing the Best I Can: Fatherhood in the Inner City.

This talk will also feature Liv Mann, team ethnographer in Kentucky for the project. She is a fifth-year Ph.D. student in sociology and social policy at Princeton University. Her research focuses on violence and the reproduction of inequality.

This lecture is made possible through an endowment from the Arthur Sulzberger Family. Please join us for a reception immediately following the talk.

Click here for directions to the Sanford School. Visitor parking is available at the Science Drive visitor’s lot, a short walk from the Sanford School. The rate is $2 per hour.

ZOOM WEBINAR.

Please join us for a review of key findings from a recently completed statewide birth-to-five early childhood needs assessment. The needs assessment was developed by the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy and The Hunt Institute on behalf of the North Carolina Division of Child Development and Early Education.

The needs assessment was designed to provide state leaders with a greater understanding of the current strengths and challenges within North Carolina’s early childhood system. The needs assessment process incorporated diverse perspectives from across the state, including parents, childcare providers, advocates and state-level leaders, as well as an examination of available administrative data.

This webinar will share key findings from the needs assessment report across a number of topic areas, including the early childhood workforce, access to high-quality child care, school readiness, social-emotional health/resilience and family supports.

A quarterly meeting for all employees of the Center for Child and Family Policy.

Faculty and researchers are invited to learn more about the expansive longitudinal database maintained by the North Carolina Education Research Data Center (NCERDC), as well as a variety of ways that external administrative or survey data can be integrated with students’ education records. The NCERDC, housed in the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, is a valuable resource for research on public school education across multiple disciplines.

NCERDC Director Kara Bonneau will present an overview of available data, the procedure for submitting a data request, and answer questions pertaining to data access or availability. Research Scientist Robert Carr of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Julie Edmunds, director of the Early College Research Center at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, will present examples of innovative research using NCERDC data linked to sources such as birth records and postsecondary data from the National Student Clearinghouse.

The workshop, co-sponsored by the Center for Child and Family Policy and the Duke University Population Research Institute, will be held at the Sanford Building, Rhodes Conference Room, 201 Science Drive on Duke’s West Campus and via Zoom.

Please register to attend in person or via Zoom. A light breakfast will be served for those who attend in person.

Join us for Locopops on the lawn to welcome the CCFP employees who recently joined us in the Sanford building and Rubenstein Hall. All Sanford faculty and staff are welcome!

A “Better Together” celebration for all CCFP employees and core faculty.

The Triangle Economics of Education Workshop brought together scholars to present and discuss empirical research on the economics of education. Dr. Thomas S. Dee, Barnett Family Professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education, gave the keynote address.

Dee is the Barnett Family Professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and the faculty director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. His research focuses largely on the use of quantitative methods to inform contemporary issues of public policy and practice. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management awarded his collaborative research the Raymond Vernon Memorial Award in 2015 and again in 2019. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Education Finance and Policy.

Congratulations to our graduating Child Policy Certificate program students and their families! We celebrate you!

It is well understood that, if a person comes to see a situation as dangerous, that person will interpret information differently, behave differently, make different choices, and change physiologically. But what if a person sees the whole world as, essentially, one big dangerous place?

Though it’s a truism that everyone sees the world differently, people’s most basic world beliefs-sometimes referred to as primal world beliefs-were only recently mapped empirically. This involved, for example, analyzing thousands of tweets and hundreds of historical texts to identify all primal world beliefs subjects could hold, then analyzing data from a few thousand subjects to determine statistically what beliefs subjects actually hold. This revealed 26 dimensions-many new to psychologists-with most clustering into the beliefs that the world is Safe (vs. dangerous), Enticing (vs. dull), and Alive (vs. mechanistic). Now, over 40 psychology labs worldwide are exploring the origins and diverse potential implications of primal world beliefs.
After introducing the research space, Dr. Jeremy Clifton will discuss some of the more surprising recent findings about connections to wellbeing, privilege, parenting, and politics.

Clifton is a senior research scientist at the Penn Positive Psychology Center and director of the Primals Project. Last year his research was featured in Forbes, The Atlantic, Fox News, Elle, and Psychology Today. received a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania studying with Dr. Martin Seligman, Dr. Angela Duckworth, and Dr. Robert DeRubeis.

Optional learning enrichment opportunity:

Before learning about primal world belief research, people often value the chance to take the Primals Inventory themselves, learn about their own primal world beliefs, and get a personalized report comparing their beliefs to a national average. That opportunity is free and publicly available here.

This 5-minute video summary of Dr. Clifton’s research provides an introduction to the topic.

What role do we have in closing racial disparities and reducing bias as we create infant and early childhood mental health career pathways? The very first Diversity-Informed Tenet for Work with Infants, Young Children and Families is: “self-awareness leads to better services for families.” In the spirit of Tenet #1, we will come together for a conversation about a promising approach to reduce racial bias in Early Care and Education settings – Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC). In this session we will explore recent research findings and policy trends happening around the country that highlight the importance of advocating for a racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse workforce in IECMHC and how it is connected to teacher and child outcomes. We will also explore approaches from several states and communities in building, supporting, and promoting a diverse IECMHC workforce.

Eva Marie Shivers, J.D., Ph.D., is the founder and executive director of Indigo Cultural Center, a non-profit action research firm located in Phoenix, Arizona. Her work at Indigo Cultural Center focuses on the developmental niche of infant and early childhood to explore the evolution of frameworks for understanding families’ culturally adaptive responses to poverty, systemic racism, and historical marginalization. Indigo Cultural Center is part of the international Healing Justice movement, and they apply liberatory consciousness principles in their IMH racial healing work around the country.

For the past 19 years, Shivers has provided racial equity and research policy consultation to federal, state and local government agencies and administrators. Shivers and her team at Indigo are currently leading national racial equity efforts to transform the infrastructure for the IECMH workforce.

She received her Ph.D. from UCLA’s Department of Education, Psychological Studies in Education. She also holds a law degree from Howard University School of Law, and a BA in English Literature from Arizona State University.

The Early Childhood Initiative seeks to bring together scholars to address early childhood challenges and produce world-class scholarship that will help maximize the potential of all children during their early years.

Wondering what comes after graduation? Join us to talk to young alums Victoria Prince PPS`18 and Lucy Wooldridge PPS`18 about their paths since leaving Duke. We will cover finding fulfilling jobs, moving to new cities, early adulting (e.g. finding apartments, insurance, 401Ks), decisions about graduate school, and how to lay the groundwork for finding your second job.

From Teach for America to non-profit policy work (Prince) and from maternal health policy to business school (Wooldridge), they will join us to share how they’ve progressed in their careers and lessons learned along the way.

Victoria Prince is a research associate for the The Aspen Insitute’s Economic Opportunities Program‘s Workforce Strategies Initiative. She is interested in public impact research related to increasing economic stability and mobility, particularly among youth and disadvantaged communities. In addition to work on education policy and charter school networks, her prior research experience includes studying how employee benefits, occupational licensing requirements, caregiving responsibilities, and community college programs may impact economic stability and mobility. After attaining a BA in public policy from Duke University in 2018, she taught eighth grade for two years as a Teach for America corps member. She is currently pursuing an MA in theology at the University of St. Thomas in her hometown of Houston, Texas.

Lucy Wooldridge is currently living in the Bay Area pursuing her MBA and Master’s of Public Health concurrently in a dual degree program at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health and the Haas School of Business. Prior to graduate school, Wooldridge worked at American Institutes for Research as an analyst and project manager for health program improvement projects. She specialized in reproductive and maternal health projects, including efforts to expand abortion access, improve postpartum maternal home visiting programs, and understand policy impacts on racial disparities in maternal mortality rates. Her interest in maternal health started at Duke, where she majored in public policy, minored in gender sexuality and feminist studies, and was a work study student at the Center for Child and Family Policy.

This speaker series is for Duke students who want to learn more about careers in child and family policy. Meetings are designed to help students explore the wide range of job opportunities and careers available in the field of child and family policy while creating a network of students who share their professional interests.

Representatives from NCDPI’s Office of Learning Recovery & Acceleration, the North Carolina Office of Strategic Partnerships, the NC Ed Futures Initiative at UNC, and the NC Longitudinal Data System (NCLDS) at NCDIT will share details about opportunities for helping North Carolina answer programmatic and policy questions.

Presenters will be:
Jeni Corn, Director of Research & Evaluation, Office of Learning Recovery & Acceleration, NCDPI
Jenni Owen, Director, North Carolina Office of Strategic Partnerships
Matt Springer, NC Education Futures Initiative
Trip Stallings, Executive Director, NC Longitudinal Data System, NCDIT

Shantel Meek, a professor of practice and the founding director of the Children’s Equity Project (CEP) at Arizona State University, will join us via Zoom to talk about her career in both research and the federal government. The Children’s Equity Project works to close opportunity gaps and dismantle systemic racism in learning settings to ensure that children reach their full potential.

Meek previously served as a consultant in early childhood policy and strategy at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington D.C., where she advised senior staff on a range of federal and state equity and early childhood policy issues. She also served in the Obama Administration as a senior policy advisor for Early Childhood Development at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and as a senior policy advisor for education in the Domestic Policy Council at the White House.

During her time in the Obama Administration, Meek advised senior officials at DHHS and The White House on a wide array of policy issues including Head Start, child care, public Pre-K expansion, and promoting equity and reducing disparities across the early care and education system. She also worked on drafting official guidance related to Head Start and the Child Care and Development Block Grant and worked closely with states, communities, and stakeholders on implementation. Meek also played a key role in President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative, leading the early childhood policy component of the initiative.

Meek has published pieces in the New York Times and the Washington Post. She serves on the boards of Child Trends and the Pyramid Model Consortium and is a member of the Ideal Learning Roundtable. She holds a B.A. in psychology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in family and human development from Arizona State University.

We will ask Meek how she got started, the twists and turns her career has taken, and her advice for students just starting their careers.

This speaker series is for Duke students who want to learn more about careers in child and family policy. Meetings are designed to help students explore the wide range of job opportunities and careers available in the field of child and family policy while creating a network of students who share their professional interests.

Derek Rhodes, PPS ’15, founder and executive director of Durham Success Summit, will join us to discuss why he quit corporate America, after leadership positions at Google, Microsoft, and the Miami Heat, to start his own nonprofit. In his own words, “I wanted to improve the lives of local, young, black men. Men just like me. Thus, the Durham Success Summit (DSS) was born.” We are going to hear what drove Derek to pursue a different path than the one he had set out on, the values that have guided him, and how he is building a career based on moral purpose.

As the founder and executive director of Durham Success Summit, Rhodes works to “increase access to business education, mentorship, and professional networking opportunities for young Black men between 16 and 24 years old in Durham.” The organization hosts both a business incubator program, which provides entrepreneurial training, mentorship, and seed funding to aspiring full-time entrepreneurs with an idea, and a 12-week accelerator program, which builds practical networking skills and provides scholars access to employers, professional mentors, and opportunities. Prior to founding Durham Success Summit, in addition to corporate experience, Rhodes worked at The Obama Foundation and interned at The White House and the Department of Justice. He holds a B.A. in public policy studies from Duke University and a certificate in disruptive strategy from Harvard Business School Online.

This speaker series is for Duke students who want to learn more about careers in child and family policy. Meetings are designed to help students explore the wide range of job opportunities and careers available in the field of child and family policy while creating a network of students who share their professional interests.